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Cnidus (Antiquity)

Author(s) : Mechtidis Petros , Paleothodoros Dimitris (3/28/2006)
Translation : Koutras Nikolaos

For citation: Mechtidis Petros, Paleothodoros Dimitris, "Cnidus (Antiquity)",
Encyclopaedia of the Hellenic World, Asia Minor
URL: <http://www.ehw.gr/l.aspx?id=8932>

Κνίδος (Αρχαιότητα) (11/9/2006 v.1) Cnidus (Antiquity) (11/10/2006 v.1) 

GLOSSARY

 

capital
The uppermost part of a column or pillar crowning the shaft and supporting the entablature. The decoration of the capital characteristizes the ancient greek orders of architecture. In Doric order the capitals are decorated with abacus and echinus, in Ionic with spiral scrolls (volutes), while the corinthian capitals are composed of small corner volutes and a basket-shaped body decorated with rows of acanthus leaves.

cavea
Τhe auditorium or audience sitting of a theater.

cella
Interior enclosed part - nucleus of a temple or other temple-shaped building.

corinthian order
The most elaborate of the ancient greek architectural orders. It was developed in the 4th century BC in Greece and it was extensively used in Roman architecture. It is similar to the Ionic order. Its capitals being four-sided and composed of a basket-shaped body decorated with volumes and rows of acanthus leaves.

doric order, the
One of the three orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek originated on the mainland and western Greece. It is characterized by short, faceted, heavy columns with plain, round capitals (tops) and no base. The capital consists of a necking which is of a simple form. The echinus is convex and the abacus is square. Above the capital is a square abacus connecting the capital to the entablature. The Entablature is divided into two horizontal registers, the lower part of which is either smooth or divided by horizontal lines. The upper half is distinctive for the Doric order. The frieze of the Doric entablature is divided into triglyphs and metopes. A triglyph is a unit consisting of three vertical bands which are separated by grooves. Metopes are plain or carved reliefs.The Doric order comes without an individual base. They instead are placed directly on the stylobate. The capital consists of a necking which is of a simple form. The echinus is convex and the abacus is square. Above the capital is a square abacus connecting the capital to the entablature. The Entablature is divided into two horizontal registers, the lower part of which is either smooth or divided by horizontal lines. The upper half is distinctive for the Doric order. The frieze of the Doric entablature is divided into triglyphs and metopes. A triglyph is a unit consisting of three vertical bands which are separated by grooves. Metopes are plain or carved reliefs.The Doric order comes without an individual base. They instead are placed directly on the stylobate.

frieze (1. architecture), (2. painting)
1. The part of the entablature resting on the architrave and below the cornice. In the Doric order the frieze is decorated with two alternative motives, namely the triglyph and metope, while in the Ionic order the frieze is a decoratively carved band.2. Decorative horizontal band that sweeps parts of a vessel or the highest part of the walls in a room.

ionic order, the
An architectural order devised in Ionia and developed in Asia Minor and the Greek islands in the 6th century BC. Its columns have elaborately moulded bases, fluted shafts (with fillets, ending in fillets), and volute capitals. The entablature consists of an three-fasciae archirave, a continuous frieze, usually richly decorated with reliefs, and a cornice. The Ionic order was more elaborate in dimentions, comparing with the Doric.

isodomic masonry (opus quadratum)
A type of masonry in which blocks of equal length and thickness are laid in courses, with each vertical joint centered on the block below.

monopteros
A circular building with a single row of columns supporting a roof

obverse
The face of the coin which bears the more important device. Due to ambiguities that sometimes exist, many numismatists prefer to use the term for the side struck by the lower (anvil) die.

odeum, the
Public building similar to the theatre, but roofed and with smaller dimensions, which was used for musical contests.

opisthodomos
The porch at the rear of the cella of a temple often used as a treasury.

podium
The base of a building

polygonal masonry
A stystem of masonry, with dressed stones which have irregular shape and vertical joints.

pronaos
The porch in front of the cella of a temple

prostyle temple
A term applied to a temple with a portico of columns in front.

pseudodipteral temple
A temple having the arrangement of columns suggesting a dipteral structure but without the inner colonnade.

pseudo-isodomic masonry
Masonry built of blocks of the same height within each course , but each course varying in height.

scene (lat. scaena -ae)
The stage building of the ancient theaters originally used for storage but provided a convenient backing for performances.

stoa, portico, the
A long building with a roof supported by one or two colonnades parallel to its back wall.

temenos
The enclosed area in which a temple stands; a sacred precinct

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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